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Julia Breckenreid
Emma
posted:
Emma: A beautiful girl, lots of smiles and loves loves loves cats, but will not be able to have one until she's much older. 
When I initially placed a dollhouse in the lower left (because I was certain she had one), she was not pleased. "Only boring kids like dolls and dollhouses!" So, when asked what would be a better replacement, she replied "A beautiful block tower." and her mother Ellen sent me a photo of what she had built for me to use as reference. A photo of math she was working on was included.
Emma takes after her mother in many ways - she loses herself in making things - doing embroidery, drawing, creating independantly every day. Ellen works at a book distribution company, and writes craft books for kids. She has an immense and beautiful collection of children's books, lots of classic illustration hanging on her walls... So this is what inspired this portrait of Emma here, in a little story of her own.
(The two rabbits in the frame also represent Ellen and Emma.)
The thumbnail to the above right is one of the shots I took of Emma's face along the way... I liked it, but she looked a little younger than she is and the shape of her eyes was not exactly right.

The Visit to NHIA
posted:

The entrance into the French Building of the NHIA campus.

Jim Burke recently had me and my pal, illustrator Carl Wiens, down to visit his illustration students at the New Hampshire Institute of Art (NHIA). Lots of fun - Mr. Burke certainly knows how to roll out the red carpet. Carl and I had a blast while we there, hanging out with Jim, John Dykes and Ryan O'Rourke - a few pints were shared while talking about illustration and school, amongst other things.

We DID go down there to do some work! The first day there, we each gave a workshop... Carl digitally created an image of a snowflake, and later on in the day I took an existing painted sketch/study of Hannah, and changed her hair, her expression, the direction she was looking and brought in some colour with oils. I spoke to the students about how I welcome disruption in my work, the way I like uncertainty and risk - and doing that to an old sketch was actually pretty hysterical and nerve wracking! Fighting that blue/black was fairly difficult. I was pretty quiet for a while, scrambling to make something come about. I'll send an "after" shot if I can get a hold of one. I didn't think to take a picture.

That same day we hung out with the students, talking to them about what they were working on, and that continued the next day, after we had done talking about ourselves and the different paths our work has taken us. As to the slideshow I took them through, I focused on the different stages my work has gone through, from the time I quit school at 16, before I found my way as an illustration student at Sheridan College, to after I graduated and where my path took me to where I am now. The idea was to show the students that your career is a work-in-progress that has many stages, learning curves and triumphs.

I was impressed with the school, the students - with Jim Burke - and how he's cultivating the NHIA illustration program. The students have an impressive amount of resources and industry at their fingertips! Made me want to go back to school... ;)

We took a detour after that, and went downhill skiing about an hour outside of Manchester NH, at the Mount Sunapee Resort. I've always wanted to try downhill skiing. What little skiing I have done has been cross-country. Carl took off to the diamond routes and I had a two hour lesson on wee training hills. I think I love downhill skiing now!

We headed back to Boston, to hang out for our last day with some illustration friends at the Museum of Fine Art. Rob DunlaveyPolly Becker and Scott Bakal. Pictured below, we're all drooling, flipping through one of Rob's countless sketchbooks. Oh, in fact, Scott has recently posted a short film about Mr. Dunlavey and his work, here.

Lastly, here's one of the more inspiring images I saw at the museum that day. A small James Abbott McNeill Whistler, titled "Harmony In Flesh Colour and Red"...

 
 
*Posted from breckenreid.com/blog
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
Visiting Artist Series: New Hampshire Institute of Art
posted:

Headed to New Hampshire this Thursday with fellow Drawger Carl Wiens to do a couple of workshops and then a dual lecture the following day at the New Hampshire Institute of Art!

Thank you Jim Burke, we're excited to be there. 
(Looking forward to hanging out with a gang of Boston illustrators next weekend...!)

The lecture will be held at NHIA:

Friday, February 27th 2015
11:30am French Building

Nautilus: Walter Pitts
posted:
"Walter Pitts was the first thinker to show how the brain is capable of processing information. Pitts saw more clearly than anyone before him the bridge between logic, mind, brain and machine: information. And he was the least likely character to do so. 
A child prodigy, a dropout, a homeless runaway, a poet and, eventually, a depressed alcoholic, Pitts was the invisible man behind the rise of artificial intelligence, theoretical neuroscience, and digital computing.
Interesting is the duality between being homeless and being recognized among well-known personalities of the academia, due to his important studies (he didn't even have a degree). Ultimately he would always find himself troubled and insecure." A great article written by Amanda Gefter.
Very excited to have worked with Len Small and Francesco Izzo at Nautilus Magazine."Walter Pitts was the first thinker to show how the brain is capable of processing information. Pitts saw more clearly than anyone before him the bridge between logic, mind, brain and machine: information. And he was the least likely character to do so. 
A child prodigy, a dropout, a homeless runaway, a poet and, eventually, a depressed alcoholic, Pitts was the invisible man behind the rise of artificial intelligence, theoretical neuroscience, and digital computing.
Interesting is the duality between being homeless and being recognized among well-known personalities of the academia, due to his important studies (he didn't even have a degree). Ultimately he would always find himself troubled and insecure." A great article written by Amanda Gefter.
Very excited to have worked with Len Small and Francesco Izzo at Nautilus Magazine.
"Walter Pitts was the first thinker to show how the brain is capable of processing information. Pitts saw more clearly than anyone before him the bridge between logic, mind, brain and machine: information. And he was the least likely character to do so.
A child prodigy, a dropout, a homeless runaway, a poet and, eventually, a depressed alcoholic, Pitts was the invisible man behind the rise of artificial intelligence, theoretical neuroscience, and digital computing.
Interesting is the duality between being homeless and being recognized among well-known personalities of the academia, due to his important studies (he didn't even have a degree). Ultimately he would always find himself troubled and insecure." A great article written by Amanda Gefter.
I wanted to show his isolation, his incredible mind and thought process, and potentially his destruction. In the idea that was chosen, I focused on his isolation and being in the centre of thought.
Very excited to have worked with Len Small and Francesco Izzo at Nautilus Magazine.


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