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Stephen Kroninger
Maurice Sendak 1928 – 2012
posted:
My copy of WHERE THE WILD THINGS ARE

 A lot has been written and said about Maurice Sendak since we all learned of his death on May 9 but I thought it was only fitting that there be a space on Drawger for all of you Drawgers and non-Drawgers alike to share your comments, thoughts, reflections and recollections.

 I met Maurice Sendak on a couple of occasions over the years. The most memorable was at a small private party at Simon & Schuster to celebrate the re-publication by Margaret K. Elderry Books of his and Beatrice Schenk De Regniers' WHAT CAN YOU DO WITH A SHOE? The party was to be for the staff in the children's book division but I begged and begged until they agreed to sneak me in. At the party Mr. Sendak graciously signed books for everyone. When it came to me I asked him to sign it to me and my wife, Aviva. He heard me incorrectly and began to write down a different name than Aviva.  When I corrected him, instead of simply crossing out the misspelling and completing the inscription, he turned his mistake into this drawing of a Wild Thing. It was the only drawing he did that day at the signing. I was honored and have treasured the book ever since. Like everyone, I'm a huge fan and a great admirer of his work.
 I added a few images to balance out the post but I'm sure his work needs no introduction to any of you.
"Tzippy," pencil sketch on vellum tracing paper. Sendak named the Wild Things after his uncles and aunts: Tzippy, Moishe, Aaron, Emile and Bernard.

Max, Moishe, Tzippy and Bernard.

Max



The following four images are sketches from 1988 for a Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade balloon.







VARIETY 1997--"Dayton's Santabear is outfitted like a "Nutcracker" toy soldier this year and his companion, Miss Bear, is dolled up as a Sugar Plum Fairy, all cuddly and adorable. But you can almost hear children's book illustrator Maurice Sendak, whose version of "The Nutcracker" is the centerpiece of Dayton's holiday celebration, barking out a few "bahs" and "blahs."

Sendak's non-cuddly "Nutcracker" stage designs and book illustrations were used for this year's animated holiday display in Dayton's downtown Minneapolis store. It's a typically elaborate affair with 150 characters and 22 walk-through tableaux - not to mention the Sendak shopping bags, cards and ornaments tied to the annual display."



Terrific collection of interviews dating from 1989 to 2011 Terry Gross: Fresh Air Remembers Author Maurice Sendak


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