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Stephen Kroninger
Nick Bruel's "Little Red Bird"
posted:
 This is Nick Bruel's latest book, "The Red Bird."  We Kroningers were surprised and delighted to find that he dedicated the book to us.

  Nick's a great guy and a wonderful artist. Give his book a look. LITTLE RED BIRD
Kirkus Reviews
 
Little Red Bird “had all she could need— / She had water and seed / And plenty to read,” but she longed, we are told, to be ever so bold: to spread her red wings and to see all the things outside of her place and the curtains of lace at the window of her dim abode. When she finds (to her glee) portals open—she’s free!—she is wracked with a moment of doubt. “Should she stay, should she go?” And do you, reader, know what you’d do if ’twas YOU wanting out? Freedom tastes pretty fine, and the park is divine, and she may even make a new friend. Trade the comforts of home for a new life, unknown? That’s the gamble of life without end. Pictures lavender-lit are a marvelous fit for this story that’s told all in rhyme. When you choose your own way, there’s a price you must pay—it’s a quandary as old as all time. (Picture book. 7-12)
 
Booklist
When Little Red Bird sees that the door to her golden cage is open, she is faced with a quandary: stay in her home, or explore the unknown? Once she has toured the bedroom, the open window beckons. But after a long day outside, discovering the joys of a nearby park, Little Red Bird finds that she misses some aspects of caged life and debates about whether to return. Bruel, author of Bad Kitty (2005), does a good job of spinning a rather sophisticated theme in a kid-friendly manner, inviting children to ponder the bird's dilemma with a repeated refrain: “I wonder what YOU would do?” Energetically mixing panels and full- page art, the illustrations point Little Red Bird (and readers) in a clear direction, showing human habitations as uninvitingly black, gray, and straight lined, while the park offers a riot of colors and shapes. The rhyming narrative, though sometimes forced, is appealingly bouncy and will draw children through the small hero’s exciting peregrinations until the final page, which hints at a satisfying conclusion while leaving room to wonder. — Krista Hutley
You people with children may be familiar with some of Nick's previous books "Boing" "Bad Kitty" "Who Is Melvin Bubble" and "Poor Puppy." Of BAD KITTY Jules Feiffer wrote, ""A for Amazing, B for Buoyant, C for Charming, "Bad Kitty" takes us on a mad and manic joy ride through the alphabet. And if once is not enough, just watch out...D for Delightful!" LITTLE RED BIRD The Nick Bruel Website


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