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Stephen Kroninger
Eisenhower Cartoon Book
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 An artifact from an era, presumably, before presidents of both parties were such polarizing figures. What I love about this book is that it speaks to a kind of cilvilty that likes of which we may never see again. Published in conjunction with the United States savings bond program in 1956

Eisenhower...invited a select group of cartoonists from the national cartoonists society to breakfast. President Eisenhower and Secretary to the treasury George M. Humphrey appeared informally, and a compilation of drawings was presented to the president...The breakfast was revealing. Eisenhower made a number of special references to cartoons and his interest in the field. He said that he avidly followed Mutt and Jeff, the comic strip created by Bud Fisher...Other artists President Eisenhower said he particulary admired were Chic young, who drew Blondie, and Hal Foster, Creator of Prince Valiant.
 Although President Eisenhower followed the comics, I always had the feeling that he didn't have much interest in cartooning as such, and I was surprised by his lack of a sense of humor. I had brought along an original cartoon...and all the cartoonists who attended the breakfast signed the crumpled drawing. Bill Holman, who created Smoket Stover, had also signed the cartoon and had lettered his motto "Foo" prominently across the cartoon. Just for the fun of it, Bill had written his trademark on the presiden't forehead in the cartoon. Ike stopped cold when he saw the inscription scrawled across his face, and said, "What the hell is that?" I explained to him that Bill Holman used the expression "Foo" as sort of a humorous symbol in his cartoon and added it was a gag.
 "Well, I don't think it's a damn bit funny." Eisenhower replied. And that was that! But he did sign the cartoon.----Art Wood, Great Cartoonists: And Their Art, 1987, page 104
Art Wood
Here are some favorites

Bob Kane

George McManus

Bud Fisher

Otto Soglow

Bill Holman

Rube Goldberg

Alex Raymond

Walt Kelly
Ham Fisher

Milton Caniff

Carmine Infantino

Bill Mauldin

Frank Frazetta
 That's what I meant by civilty, Steve. You have no idea what the politics of the artists were from these drawings. It was a project to support Savings Bonds. Everyone was on their best behavior. I can't imagine a similar venture being undertaken today with the same results.


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