top
log-in
Richard Borge
Chatbots Attack! WSJ illo
posted:
Here is a recent piece done for The Wall Street Journal. The article was about “chatbots”, which is popular in Asia and now happening here. I wanted to show a guy walking through a landscape of these bots. Daniel Smith referred me to an earlier image of mine, and we used that as a jump off point. Working with the WSJ is always a collaborative process.... thanks much to Daniel Smith for being a terrific art director.
Those of you that were in my ICON After Effects demo may recognize one of these bots (similar to what I used in the demo)... I'll have to animate this illo at some point.
Below is the final art, sketches and another detail.

OBJECTS Found and Claimed
posted:
OBJECTS Found and Claimed
New work by Richard Borge and John Borge
Hey Drawgers, I have an exhibit opening with my brother John on Friday night at The Rourke Art Gallery in Moorhead MN. Below are some of the images we will show and some of the text describing the work and idea of the show. Much of my work are large prints on aluminum, while John's are various photographic methods. John had an instrumental role in me going into art in the first place, so it's always a pleasure to show with him.
The idea of OBJECTS Found and Claimed  came from the fact that as artists, we both work with found objects, and in different creative processes, we create something new, claiming the object as our own. We share a fascination with finding objects – that become subject matter in the creation of new work.

I am always finding beauty and oddness in objects, usually when I am not looking for it. Working with found and created objects has been a passion for my entire career, and I find that a large part of what I do as an artist is find (and expose) beauty in ugly things. My fascination with old surfaces and textures comes largely from the sense of time and history that it gives off. For example, a merry-go-round that has been in use for 20 years will have a much different energy that a brand new merry-go-round. Through the wear and tear marks on the surface, repaired parts, repainting and modifications, we will see a story and get us a sense of time not found in a new one. This story and sense of time gives it a certain “life”, not yet breathed into the shiny new merry-go-round. This can be in the form of a rusty surface, a distorted shape or a distressed toy. When working with a found objects, it generally gets modified and tweaked until I feel it’s mine (claimed).
Mister Hands, Profile Medium: Archival Print on Aluminum, (limited edition of 5) Dimensions: 24” x 20” x 3/4”

Big Talker, Profile Medium: Archival Print on Aluminum, (limited edition of 5) Dimensions: 24” x 20” x 3/4”

Blender Man, Profile Medium: Archival Print on Aluminum, (limited edition of 5) Dimensions: 24” x 20” x 3/4”

Ducky Tank, Profile Medium: Archival Print on Aluminum, (limited edition of 5) Dimensions: 20” x 16” x 3/4”

Little Robot Big Medium: Archival Paper Prints on Wood Panels. Dimensions: 43.5” x 34” x 2”

Full Frontal Insanity (limited edition of 36) Medium: Archival Print on Paper (Hahnemühle cotton rag, 308 grams) Dimensions: 22” x 17”

Full Profile Insanity (limited edition of 36) Medium: Archival Print on Paper (Hahnemühle cotton rag, 308 grams) Dimensions: 22” x 17”

Medusa Profile, Left (limited edition of 36) Medium: Archival Print on Paper (Hahnemühle cotton rag, 308 grams) Dimensions: 22” x 17”

Spaceman 1 (limited edition of 36) Medium: Archival Print on Paper (Hahnemühle cotton rag, 308 grams) Dimensions: 22” x 17”

As a photographer, John builds still life imagery in the studio from objects found, and from objects in their existing environment.

John: “When I first began working in the photographic medium, I was drawn to the nearly instant gratification of being able to record a scene and reproduce it as a photograph in a matter of hours. Much of the process was simply recording a scene – a group of objects, an activity, a pretty face – more than thinking of it as creating something new.  Over time my vision has evolved into a sense of creating a new thing – not just recording something that already exists. In building a still life, I often work in the opposite direction as Richard and deconstruct the setting, simplify it to make it clearer in meaning. My fascination with working with found objects is different than Richard’s in that I often go out and search for a specific type of object, bring it back to my studio and recreate it using light and shadow. In addition, the idea of claiming a found object carries through to the process of creating a still life with objects found on location, through the use of light, angle and placement of objects within the camera frame.
 
A big thanks to Tania Blanich and Alan Ochocki for all their help putting this exhibit together. See more at http://www.therourke.org/
John Borge

John Borge

John Borge

John Borge





Computer World series
posted:

Computer World's April Montgomery contacted me to do this series about the questions, concerns and pitfalls regarding modern cloud computing. I love working with April and the people at Computer World because it is always a collaboration in the truest sense. We had a lot of fun with this series. A big thanks to April and the team at CW.
Navigating a dangerous landscape via cloud computing.

Missteps, recoveries and alligators.

Mad cloud computing skills.

Bulletproof contract.

Deets.

sketches

Recent Work
posted:
It’s been a little while since posting... here are a few things I’ve worked on recently. As always, I enjoy the topics that need a conceptual solution. I find that often times the ones that are the toughest to solve (or seemingly the most technical content) can produce the strongest solutions.
For The Wall Street Journal for an article about “closed end funds”… we chose to focus on the “rewards vs. risk” aspect of it. Thanks much to Orlie Kraus for being a terrific art director.

For the Washington Post, about the importance of encrypting online newspapers. Thanks to Carla Broyles for great art direction.

For the Progressive, about Voter ID requirements, and how it is keeping lower income people and minorities from being able to vote. Thanks to Ruth Conniff for great art direction, and for having me contribute to the Comment Section page for a few times in a row now.

For the Washington Post, about smaller institutions getting sucked up by a giant cloud conglomerate. Thanks to Madia T Brown for great art direction.

Recent Articles
Topics
Archive

Illustrations by Richard Borge (26)

work early 2009 (6)

Recent Work (9)
ANIMATION links
links
Borge is teaching at TutorMill, an online mentoring site for students of illustration!