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Alan Witschonke
December 2011
Bread and Butter
posted:
#1

Every illustrator would love to be able to fill up their time doing the very plum assignments, like Time magazine or New Yorker covers. But in reality a lot of us, myself included, must rely on getting some assignments that may be a little less glamorous but are no less important, to earn a living in this business. The bread and butter jobs. If it’s a project that you know fits your style and you have the time, why not do it? That’s how you build your client base.
#2

When I got an email from Shape magazine asking me to do a series of plates of prepared food, comparing a healthy meal to a less healthy one, I didn’t hesitate to accept. I’ve illustrated a number of cookbooks so I was familiar with this type of work. I also knew the assignment would fill in a gap between a couple other jobs and that it would be fun and pretty straightforward. Art Directors Susanne Johansson and Sarah Munoz were great to work with and the job went very smoothly.
#3

This all brings me to an exchange I had a long time ago with my former Greek landlord, who didn’t speak English very well. (He turned out to be a great landlord and a real gentleman). When I was a prospective tenant and he was interviewing me, he asked what I did for a living. I replied, “I’m an Illustrator, that’s my bread and butter.” He looked at me incredulously and asked, “You sell bread and butter?” Well Mr. Anastasopoulos, I guess I do sell bread and butter – sometimes.
#4

#5

#6

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Witschonke is teaching at TutorMill, an online mentoring site for students of illustration!